Editor’s note: This is the latest in our series of personal essays about the neighborhoods of Fort Worth and Tarrant County. To read other installments in the series, please click here.

By Rosalinda and Arturo Martinez

The Hispanic/Latino community is the fastest-growing population in North Texas. In Fort Worth history, there have been four Mexican “Barrios,” neighborhoods rich in culture and heritage. You had North Side, Hell’s Half Acre, La Fundición and La Corte “Barrios.”

Northside, now known as the Far Greater Northside Historical neighborhood, is located close to downtown Fort Worth and near the Stockyards National Historic District. According to the census, the Hispanic population of the Far Greater Northside Historical is 78%.

My connection to the neighborhood began 21 years ago, but goes back even further with my in-laws who immigrated to north Fort Worth In the 1960s. At that time, my father in-law’s grandparents and their nine children lived in a three-block radius. As a result, my husband, Arturo Martinez, and our three children were born and raised in the Far Greater Northside Historical neighborhood, also known as “La Loma.”

Like most residents in Fort Worth education, family and faith are essential to our family. Arturo and our three children are proud products of Fort Worth ISD; our three children attended the same local neighborhood schools as my husband. Washington Heights Elementary and Kirkpatrick Middle School, all in walking distance from our home, and our youngest daughter was bused to Young Women’s Leadership Academy.

Arturo is a proud Diamond Hill-Jarvis High School alumnus, and soon we will have three North Side High School alumni. Additionally, our oldest daughter currently attends Tarrant County College – Trinity River Campus. For years, our family attended Mass regularly at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, once located on Long Avenue and now on Blue Mound Road. My husband and I volunteer as Catechists, teaching religious formation to our middle school students from the community.

Throughout our neighborhood, you will find colorful street art created by local talent. For example, there is the mural at Franko’s Market by local artist Arnoldo Hurtado of our world-renowned North Side High School’s Mariachi Espuelas de Plata. We enjoy several parks and trails within walking distance.

A family favorite is Marine Park and Marine Park Aquatic Center located on 20th Street. We enjoy walking, playing volleyball and skateboarding. You can always find an el paletero/ice cream man to purchase refreshing ice cream. 

If you follow me on Instagram, @pequenarosa11, you know I’m such a “foodie” and enjoy authentic taste of Mexican cuisine. In my opinion, we have the best tacos in Fort Worth, from Benito’s in Diamond Hill (best carne asada tacos), Guajardo’s Tacos Al Pastor on 28th Street (best tortas), and Beto Hernandez Foods on Long Avenue and Azle Street (best barbacoa tacos and menudo).

We are truly grateful to live in a colorful, vibrant community, where family, education and community come first and where we value our community and our cultura.

Rosalinda and Arturo Martinez are longtime, active Northside residents. They both graduated from Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas, and both work for Tarrant County College. Arturo is the district director of creative services and Rosalinda is an admissions associate.

To tell the story of where you live, please send your essay to hello@fortworthreport.org and Managing Editor Thomas Martinez at thomas.martinez@fortwortheport.org

Far Greater Northside Historical

Total population: 5,750
Female: 50% | Male: 50%

Age
0-9: 19%
10-19: 20%
20-29: 16%
30-39: 14%
40-49: 10%
50-59: 7%
60-69: 8%
70-79: 4%
80 and older: 3%

Education
No degree: 43%
High school: 37%
Some college: 16%
Bachelor’s degree: 4%
Post-graduate: 1%


Race
White: 4% | Asian: 0% | Hispanic: 78% | Black: 18% | Two or more: 0%


Click on the link to view the schools’ Texas Education Agency ratings:

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