From a public art dedication at Rockwood Park to Texas Christian University artists shining at ArtsGoggle, our photojournalist at the Fort Worth Report captures the diversity of events through images of the week. If you have events or photo opportunities, contact community engagement journalist Cristian ArguetaSoto at cristian.arguetasoto@fortworthreport.org or on Twitter.

A crowd listens to Rebecca Low, the owner of the Rebecca Low Sculpture Gallery. Low partnered with Mike Ross to create the sculpture. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
President of Gamtex Industries Arnold Gachman greets Fort Worth Mayor Mattie Parker on April 27. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Arnold Gachman, the president of Gamtex Industries, walks to the podium on April 27. The company celebrated its centennial a few years ago and dedicated a public art sculpture to its legacy. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Arnold Gachman, the president of Gamtex Industries, far left, and his family stand for the Ukrainian National Anthem. Gachman’s family migrated to the U.S. from Ukraine in the early 20th century. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
“Eonothem,” a new sculpture at Rockwood Park, is made of recycled aluminum. The piece is sponsored by the city of Fort Worth and Gamtex Industries, which recently celebrated its centennial. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Pastor Michael Bell of Greater St. Stephen First Church-Baptist speaks to reporters in front of Paschal High School on April 28 following the release of a video depicting a student using racial slurs in a classroom. (Sandra Sadek | Fort Worth Report)
Samantha Glenn and Collin Zreet, co-owners of Funky Picnic Brewery & Cafe, sit inside their brew pub. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Jennifer Esparza, 18, received a full-ride scholarship to Texas Christian University through the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas’ Latinas in Progress program. Esparza will study computer science and engineering after being involved in robotics and sustainability clubs at Marine Creek Collegiate High School. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Poet Jerry Shafer reads a poem he wrote on the way to the venue on April 25. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Books banned in Texas sits on a table for guests to take on April 25 at The Rose Chapel, 1519 Lipscomb St. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Singer Marta Salazar introduces herself on April 25. The performer sang three Latin American folk songs. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Roger Crandall’s falcon eats a dead prey bird after flying through the skies above Arlington’s landfill. The falcon serves as a deterrent to migrating seagulls. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Roger Crandall has been a master falconer since he was 16. His company, Fal-Tech Inc., provides bird control services to Arlington and Fort Worth’s southeast landfill. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Roger Crandall, owner of Fal-Tech Inc., uses a lure and a whistle to bring his peregrine falcon down from the sky above Arlington’s landfill. Crandall has worked with Arlington since 2013. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Roger Crandall holds up a lure of food for a falcon that he launched to deter a growing number of seagulls crowded on a trash pile in Arlington. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Republic Services is the landfill management contractor for Arlington and oversees a 774-acre facility. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
About 850 trucks travel in and out Arlington’s landfill each day, delivering waste to be compacted down by 125,000-pound machines. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley, center, Criminal District Attorney Sharen Wilson, right, and Victim Assistance coordinator Carmaneta Anderson, left, unveil a tribute to crime victims and the people behind helping crime victims on April 25 at the Tarrant County Administration Building, 100 E. Weatherford St., in honor of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
A crowd gathers on April 25 at the Tarrant County Administration Building, 100 E. Weatherford St. A wreath is present to honor crime victims for National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
A wreath honoring crime victims is unveiled on April 25 at the Tarrant County Administration Building, 100 E. Weatherford St. Wreaths were also presented at the Southwest Subcourthouse, Northeast Subcourthouse, Subcourthouse in Arlington and Northwest Subcourthouse. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
A list of entities who have helped with victim recovery and crime prevention is unveiled with a wreath on April 25. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
People walk by Texas Christian University Art Org’s tent on April 23. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Texas Christian University students sell their artwork on April 23 at ArtsGoggle. The nine students are a part of an art club, Art Org. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Megan Breedlove, right, and her husband Phillip Breedlove have lived together in Rosemont since 1995. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Twins Jack Hein and Jason Thing sell ceramic art on April 23. The brothers both study ceramics at Texas Christian University and follow traditional Japanese and Chinese art styles while also experimenting with more contemporary, abstract styles, Hein said. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)
Artists in Texas Christian University’s Art Org sell their art pieces at ArtsGoggle. The artists set up their tents at 8 a.m. and sold art through 10 p.m on April 23. (Cristian ArguetaSoto | Fort Worth Report)

Creative Commons License

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under a Creative Commons license.

Avatar photo

Cristian ArguetaSoto

Cristian ArguetaSoto is the community engagement journalist at the Fort Worth Report. He can be reached at cristian.arguetasoto@fortworthreport.org or (817) 317-6991.